Keychain / Kokopelli Information & History

About the keychain

The figure on all of our keychains is called Kokopelli.  He is an ancient and sacred symbol to the Natives of the Southwestern US (mainly) and often pictured playing the flute, hunched over and with a Mohawk and sometimes carrying a bag on his back or dancing.  Kokopelli has a rich history in folklore and is often described as a symbol of good luck, a jokester or a magician.

The shape of our keychain represents an arrowhead.  These tools were widely used all throughout human civilization by hunter-gatherers from all over the world and made from various forms of rock or stone (most notably Flint) though sometimes bone, wood or metal.  Human's very distant ancestors first sharpened stones into projectile points hundreds of thousands of years ago.  Over a very long period of time, they finally created the bow and arrow, which we are all familiar with today.

More about Kokopelli and his history

He is a magical character, considered to be an ancient God of Fertility (plants, animals and people), whose petroglyphs were first carved around 3,000 years ago.  In his legend, Kokopelli the flute player was the symbol of happiness and joy.  His beautiful flute playing would bring warmth and make seeds grow and heal wounds.  There are many stories about Kokopelli, traveling to a village playing his music, carrying seeds and the next morning all of the crops were plentiful and women were pregnant.  He is thought to be responsible for the end of winter and the coming of the spring.

Our personal family history regarding Kokopelli (by Christine)

"I personally know of encounters with Kokopelli in our current world. Three infertile women, living unconnected lives, came to be in the presence of Kokopelli on various objects. Soon after pregnancies occurred. In hard financial times Kokopelli appeared on a necklace. It was worn and soon after miraculous events happened, a new direction in life and sudden success.  His image reminds us to slow down, be hopeful, be grateful, look forward and love ourselves and others and find the joy in living for it is there in all of us.

Whether you believe in Kokopelli or not is up to you. But I believe there is something magical and spiritual about the little guy. I think he truly does bring happiness and plenty, even if it is only a smile to someone's face and the good feeling of just being alive."